Musing Mondays (June 8)

It never rains but it pours. I am talking about the books I received in the last 10 days, while 20 days prior there was a veritable desert of new books here.

 

Musing Mondays is a meme over at the blog called A Daily Rhythm by Jenn, which has a whole lot of options regarding your bookish activities during the previous and coming up week and are as follows :

  • I’m currently reading…
  • Up next I think I’ll read…
  • I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
  • I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I can’t wait to get a copy of…
  • I wish I could read ___, but…
  • I blogged about ____ this past week

 

So I am currently reading SoulSpirit.

Up next I have no idea what I will pick up.

The following are the books that came my way last week –

1) God Help The Child – Toni Morrison (Courtesy : Penguin Random House India)

God-help-the-child

A young woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life, but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love. There is Booker, the man Bride loves, and loses to anger. Rain, the mysterious white child with whom she crosses paths. And finally, Bride’s mother herself, Sweetness, who takes a lifetime to come to understand that “what you do to children matters. And they might never forget.”

2) World Order – Henry Kissinger (Courtesy : Penguin Random House India)

Sometimes I shudder at the way my mind tricks me into trying to become a better person, leaving me with some very bewildering consequences. Hence, this book.

Henry Kissinger offers in World Order a deep meditation on the roots of international harmony and global disorder. Drawing on his experience as one of the foremost statesmen of the modern era—advising presidents, traveling the world, observing and shaping the central foreign policy events of recent decades—Kissinger now reveals his analysis of the ultimate challenge for the twenty-first century: how to build a shared international order in a world of divergent historical perspectives, violent conflict, proliferating technology, and ideological extremism.

3) Reckless – Hasan Ali Toptas (Courtesy : Bloomsbury India)

RecklessThirty years after completing his military service, Ziya flees the spiraling turmoil and perplexing chaos of the city where he lives to seek a peaceful existence in a remote village—of which he has heard dreamlike tales. Greeted by his old friend from the army, Kenan, who has built and furnished a vineyard house for him, Ziya grows accustomed to his new surroundings and is welcomed by Kenan’s family. However, the village does not provide the serenity Ziya yearns for, and old memories of his military service on the treacherous Syrian/Turkish border flood his thoughts. As he battles specters of the past, his rejection of village life provokes an undercurrent of ill feeling among the locals, not least towards Kenan, who has incurred heavy debts by his generosity to the man who may have saved his life.

4) Soul Print – Megan Miranda (Courtesy : Bloomsbury India)

With the science of soul-fingerprinting a reality, Alina Chase has spent her entire life imprisoned for the crimes her past-self committed. In an attempt to clear her name, Alina unintentionally trades one prison for another when she escapes, aided by a group of teens whose intentions and motivations are a mystery to her. As she gets to know one of the boys, sparks fly, and Alina believes she may finally be able to trust someone. But when she uncovers clues left behind from her past life that only she can decipher, secrets begin to unravel. Alina must figure out whether she’s more than the soul she inherited, or if she’s fated to repeat the past.

5) The Following Girls – Louise Levene (Courtesy : Bloomsbury India)

When Amanda Baker was 14 she found a letter written by her runaway mother to her unborn child: ‘Dear Jeremy’ it began ‘or Amanda…’

Mrs Baker still sends Christmas presents – Meccano, a fishing rod, a Spare Rib subscription – but her daughter is now in the coolly capable hands of Mr Baker’s second wife, Pam, who trots home from work on her stacked heels to her formica ‘dream kitchen’, where she curls butter, grills grapefruit and swigs sherry from the bottle hidden under the sink. Meanwhile Amanda’s dad, soured by his experiences with free-spirited women, crossbreeds fuchsias and salivates over glossy prospectuses in search of a new school for his disappointing daughter.

The happiest days of your life? Not for Baker, sixteen and sick of it as she moves miserably between lessons packed with palm fibre and the use of the dative. Baker’s only solace is her fifth form gang – the four Mandies – and a low-calorie diet of king-sized cigarettes, until she teams up with Julia Smith, games captain and consummate game player. And so begins a passionate friendship that will threaten her future, menace her sanity and risk the betrayal of everything and everyone she holds dear.

The random question this week is ‘What book would you recommend to someone today?’

Well that will definitely have to be ‘The tusk that did the damage’. The reasons I have elaborated in my post here –  https://malvikajaswal.wordpress.com/2015/05/02/the-tusk-that-did-the-damage-tania-james/

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